Published in  The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Middle-Eastern and North African History.  Edited by Amal Ghazal and Jens Hanssen

ABSTRACT
Conventional frameworks for understanding the Yemeni uprising that began in 2011 often fail to incorporate the role of mobilized publics and previous forms of contestations in the buildup to the uprising, and in the continued struggle for the social, political, and economic transformation of Yemen. The purpose of this chapter is to highlight the legacies and intersectionalities of various forms of contestations that developed in Yemen since 1990, represented by the activities of the Huthis in the North, al-Hirak in the South and civil society, including youth and women, and to explore their impact on the uprising and the pro-democracy movement since 2011. Political actions taken to address corruption, unemployment, and lack of basic human rights had created an oppositional identity that facilitated collective actions during the uprising in 2011.

 

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